Summer camp selection is no easy task. If you and your child have talked and decided that he or she is ready for summer camp, there is a place to begin. A free website called www.summercampadvice.com has been prepared by experienced directors of a long established camp to help you choose the best one for your child. This article will offer you some basic guidelines that can help you in making a well-informed decision.
Choose a camp taking into account the requirements and desires of your youngster beyond your own preferences. Include your child in the search process and have an ongoing discussion about the important things that you and your kid want from joining the camp. A child is going to want to do what he or she thinks will be fun, and that really IS important. As a parent do you want your child to enhance particular skills, learn independence in a safe environment, or develop self-confidence? Together, take note of his or her special interests and find out if your child has any intellectual, social or physical issues that require consideration. Summer camp populations may be all girls, all boys, brother and sister or co-ed. At co-ed summer camps, boys and girls do participate in many supervised camp activities together. They share use of amenities such as dining halls and swimming and waterfront areas. Brother and sister camps provide structured opportunities for social interaction but most of the time facilities and activities are separate for girls and boys. Private summer camps are more costly than nonprofit summer camps, but price does not always equate with the quality of a young camper's experience at that camp. It is best to anticipate extra expenses involved in choosing and going to summer camp such as extra canoe trip or activity charges and the cost of your visit to the camp. When you contact a camp you are considering, the director should be happy to give you complete information about the true cost of that camp. Keep in mind as you discuss this or other topics that the attitude of a camp's directors and staff will have more bearing on your child's experience than the cost. Usually the duration of a camp can range from one to eight weeks. Consider your child's willingness to be away from home, for days or overnight. Ongoing discussion with your child will be helpful, especially for balancing fear with anticipation and excitement. A first time camper will often face an adjustment and that may be temporarily challenging for some kids. Find out how the camp accommodates and deals with a first time camper's homesickness and the initial adjustment to camp life. A conversation about this area with a camp's director can also show you if the attitude so important to a good experience of camp is going to be there when your child arrives. Your child may want to join a camp with friends. Although it is natural for a youngster to want to go to camp with his or her friends, there are instances when there is value in time away from accustomed peer pressures. When it comes to learning independence and developing self confidence there can be an advantage to starting fresh in an unfamiliar environment. Children usually have restrictions and achievement pressures when in school and at home, but at summer camp they are free to try different things with new friends. With the help of knowledgeable staff and counselors in the camp, campers of all ages can safely find out what works best and what doesn't in terms of interpersonal relationships. You can find out more about how to bring these opportunities to your child's life by visiting www.summercampadvice.com.
Summer camp selection is no easy task. If you and your child have talked and decided that he or she is ready for summer camp, there is a place to begin. A free website called www.summercampadvice.com has been prepared by experienced directors of a long established camp to help you choose the best one for your child. This article will offer you some basic guidelines that can help you in making a well-informed decision.
Choose a camp taking into account the requirements and desires of your youngster beyond your own preferences. Include your child in the search process and have an ongoing discussion about the important things that you and your kid want from joining the camp. A child is going to want to do what he or she thinks will be fun, and that really IS important. As a parent do you want your child to enhance particular skills, learn independence in a safe environment, or develop self-confidence? Together, take note of his or her special interests and find out if your child has any intellectual, social or physical issues that require consideration. Summer camp populations may be all girls, all boys, brother and sister or co-ed. At co-ed summer camps, boys and girls do participate in many supervised camp activities together. They share use of amenities such as dining halls and swimming and waterfront areas. Brother and sister camps provide structured opportunities for social interaction but most of the time facilities and activities are separate for girls and boys. Private summer camps are more costly than nonprofit summer camps, but price does not always equate with the quality of a young camper's experience at that camp. It is best to anticipate extra expenses involved in choosing and going to summer camp such as extra canoe trip or activity charges and the cost of your visit to the camp. When you contact a camp you are considering, the director should be happy to give you complete information about the true cost of that camp. Keep in mind as you discuss this or other topics that the attitude of a camp's directors and staff will have more bearing on your child's experience than the cost. Usually the duration of a camp can range from one to eight weeks. Consider your child's willingness to be away from home, for days or overnight. Ongoing discussion with your child will be helpful, especially for balancing fear with anticipation and excitement. A first time camper will often face an adjustment and that may be temporarily challenging for some kids. Find out how the camp accommodates and deals with a first time camper's homesickness and the initial adjustment to camp life. A conversation about this area with a camp's director can also show you if the attitude so important to a good experience of camp is going to be there when your child arrives. Your child may want to join a camp with friends. Although it is natural for a youngster to want to go to camp with his or her friends, there are instances when there is value in time away from accustomed peer pressures. When it comes to learning independence and developing self confidence there can be an advantage to starting fresh in an unfamiliar environment. Children usually have restrictions and achievement pressures when in school and at home, but at summer camp they are free to try different things with new friends. With the help of knowledgeable staff and counselors in the camp, campers of all ages can safely find out what works best and what doesn't in terms of interpersonal relationships. You can find out more about how to bring these opportunities to your child's life by visitingwww.summercampadvice.com.
Picking the best camp
The experience children get when they go to summer camp is something that will have an effect on the rest of their lives. As a parent it is important that you and your child choose the 
best summer camps together. Finding the camp that best fits your budget and your child's needs can be a daunting task that requires loads of effort up front. Before you...send your camper to the nearest or the cheapest camp out there, you might want to consider this short guide.

Take the time to inform yourself about the wide range of options available to choose from. It takes time, but it makes sense to gather camp information prior to sending your kids somewhere. One of the most surprising things you will find out is that there are so many different types of camps. There are overnight camps and day camps of every duration from one to two weeks to one to two months. Camps can also be categorized according to the age ranges and genders of the participants they accept and how they conduct their programs for the campers they have. There are coed camps where boys and girls get to mingle . There are camps exclusive to girls or boys. Then there are brother/sister camps where boys and girls attend the neighboring camps with selective interaction. Camps can either be categorized by an area of particular focus such as general, academic, religious, special needs, and activity or theme specialty, to name a few.

Ask your child what he or she wants to get out of the experience. More than anything else, the goal of a summer camp is to let the kids have fun while at the same time instilling valuable life lessons. To ensure that your kid will get the best experience possible, you need to fit what they want to do with what activities a camp offers. This will enable you to shorten your list of camps to those that offer the features they will enjoy the most. AS a parent never pick a camp for what you want or think your child may want. Talk with him or her. At Swift Nature Camp, we often have parents who want their child outside away from a screen and we have been successful with this only because we have so many other fun things to do.

Determine your budget carefully. The cost of sending your kids to camp can vary depending on the camp's duration, programs, activities and location. Day camps can be very modestly priced and full season sleepaway camps offer expanded experience at an expanded price. When you are determining your budget for summer camp, remember that your kids will not be in the house during that time, and consider how much you'll save in terms of household expenses. Be sure to check pricing carefully, contacting the director if necessary. Many camp directors are willing to work with parents or have special programs to allow for children from lower income families to attend camp.

When possible visit the summer camp. Once you have shortened your list you and your child should take time to visit the camp. This is important since doing so will definitely help you in determining that a particular camp is really the right fit for your kid.  Each summer we have families join our camp for a few hours they take a tour of the camp, looking at condition, facilities, and the fun campers are having.  Make sure to talk to the camp director and staff members too, if possible. You'll get to know the camp better and be sure it is a place well worth entrusting your child to. If this is not possible see if the camp has any local open houses or maybe the directors can com visit you at your home.

To learn more about Wisconsin Summer Camps
and finding the best one for your child visit Summer Camp Advice
The experience children get when they go to summer camp is something that will have an effect on the rest of their lives. As a parent it is important that you and your child choose the best summer camps together. Finding the camp that best fits your budget and your child's needs can be a daunting task that requires loads of effort up front. Before you....
send your camper to the nearest or the cheapest camp out there, you might want to consider this short guide.
 
Take the time to inform yourself about the wide range of options available to choose from. It takes time, but it makes sense to gather camp information prior to sending your kids somewhere. One of the most surprising things you will find out is that there are so many different types of camps. There are overnight camps and day camps of every duration from one to two weeks to one to two months. Camps can also be categorized according to the age ranges and genders of the participants they accept and how they conduct their programs for the campers they have. There are coed camps where boys and girls get to mingle . There are camps exclusive to girls or boys. Then there are brother/sister camps where boys and girls attend the neighboring camps with selective interaction. Camps can either be categorized by an area of particular focus such as general, academic, religious, special needs, and activity or theme specialty, to name a few.
 
Ask your child what he or she wants to get out of the experience. More than anything else, the [aim | goal] of a summer camp is to let the kids have fun while at the same time instilling valuable life lessons. To ensure that your kid will get the best experience possible, you need to fit what they want to do with what activities a camp offers. This will enable you to shorten your list of camps to those that offer the features they will enjoy the most.
 
Determine your budget carefully. The cost of sending your kids to camp can vary depending on the camp's duration, programs, activities and location. Day camps can be very modestly priced and full season sleepaway camps offer expanded experience at an expanded price. When you are determining your budget for summer camp, remember that your kids will not be in the house during that time, and consider how much you'll save in terms of household expenses. Be sure to check pricing carefully, contacting the director if necessary. Many camp directors are willing to work with parents or have special programs to allow for children from lower income families to attend camp.
 
Visit the summer camp when you are close to making your choice for it. Once you have shortened your list using the [aforementioned | preceding] guidelines, you and your child should take time to [go to | visit] the camp or camps you're considering. This is important since doing so will definitely help you in determining that a camp is really the right fit for your kid. Take a tour of the camp; take note of its condition, facilities, and how safe the place is. But the essence of every camp is the people who are there. Make sure to talk to the camp director and staff members too, if possible. You'll get to know the camp better, as a place well worth entrusting your child to.

To learn more about summer camps and finding the best one for your child.

Summer camp selection is no easy task. If you and your child have talked and decided that he or she is ready for summer camp, there is a place to begin. A free website called www.summercampadvice.com has been prepared by experienced directors of a long established camp to help you choose the best one for your child. This article will offer you some basic guidelines that can help you in making a well-informed decision.
Choose a camp taking into account the requirements and desires of your youngster beyond your own preferences. Include your child in the search process and have an ongoing discussion about the important things that you and your kid want from joining the camp. A child is going to want to do what he or she thinks will be fun, and that really IS important. As a parent do you want your child to enhance particular skills, learn independence in a safe environment, or develop self-confidence? Together, take note of his or her special interests and find out if your child has any intellectual, social or physical issues that require consideration. Summer camp populations may be all girls, all boys, brother and sister or co-ed. At co-ed summer camps, boys and girls do participate in many supervised camp activities together. They share use of amenities such as dining halls and swimming and waterfront areas. Brother and sister camps provide structured opportunities for social interaction but most of the time facilities and activities are separate for girls and boys. Private summer camps are more costly than nonprofit summer camps, but price does not always equate with the quality of a young camper's experience at that camp. It is best to anticipate extra expenses involved in choosing and going to summer camp such as extra canoe trip or activity charges and the cost of your visit to the camp. When you contact a camp you are considering, the director should be happy to give you complete information about the true cost of that camp. Keep in mind as you discuss this or other topics that the attitude of a camp's directors and staff will have more bearing on your child's experience than the cost. Usually the duration of a camp can range from one to eight weeks. Consider your child's willingness to be away from home, for days or overnight. Ongoing discussion with your child will be helpful, especially for balancing fear with anticipation and excitement. A first time camper will often face an adjustment and that may be temporarily challenging for some kids. Find out how the camp accommodates and deals with a first time camper's homesickness and the initial adjustment to camp life. A conversation about this area with a camp's director can also show you if the attitude so important to a good experience of camp is going to be there when your child arrives. Your child may want to join a camp with friends. Although it is natural for a youngster to want to go to camp with his or her friends, there are instances when there is value in time away from accustomed peer pressures. When it comes to learning independence and developing self confidence there can be an advantage to starting fresh in an unfamiliar environment. Children usually have restrictions and achievement pressures when in school and at home, but at summer camp they are free to try different things with new friends. With the help of knowledgeable staff and counselors in the camp, campers of all ages can safely find out what works best and what doesn't in terms of interpersonal relationships. You can find out more about how to bring these opportunities to your child's life by visitingwww.summercampadvice.com.

Summer Camp Should Be Mandatory for a Child: 
It Changes Lives

By Phillip Morris
Call it an emotional report card.
It was one of those moments that give you a reality check on how your kid really feels about you deep down.........
I had just rounded the bend that led to her cabin at Camp Christopher, a residential campground in Bath Township. It was Saturday, and she had been gone for six days — the longest she had been separated from her mother and me during her eleven years on the planet.
I was busy running my mouth, so the little girl spotted me first and set upon me like a blur. As she screamed “Daddy!” while racing the fifty yards or so toward me, I noticed that she had a large black boot on her left foot and a sandal on her right.
She nearly bowled me over as she leaped into my arms and exclaimed “Daddy!” several times and hugged me tight.
She told me she missed me “so much,” and then shifted her weight, which was my signal to put her down.
Once on the ground, she stepped back, looked me up and down, and then spoke to a friend who had come running up behind her: “My dad has a hole in his t-shirt. Daddy, why are you wearing that shirt?” she asked, redirecting her gaze toward me.
I could only shake my head. That’s when I knew my loving moment was over. Now Faith was back to being a pre-teen.
My designer t-shirt, with the strategically placed designer hole in it, was fair game. Now, after being separated for a week, I had to stand there and listen while my gear was publicly critiqued by a sixth-grader wearing a rubber boot and a sandal.
It wasn’t until we got the girl to the car with all of her luggage — including the broken sandal that had been replaced by the boot — that I started to understand how a week away from the parents, how a week at a well-run 
summer camp, can change your kid’s perspective, if not their life.
Only after she did a rapid checklist of everything she had done during the week — the swimming, the hiking, the canoeing, the fishing, the archery, the zip-lining, the horseback riding, and the learning of more campground songs, cheers, and prayers than any kid she should learn in six days — did she finally get to the heart of her camping experience.
“Daddy, I know what I want to do now when I grow up,” she said about thirty minutes into our drive home.
“I want to work with mentally disabled people.”
The short statement that seemingly came out of left field momentarily stunned me.
The girl has told folks for years that she plans to become a singer, a writer, and possibly an attorney when she grew up.
But as we drove, I recalled that she had enthusiastically spoken to a mentally-challenged young man as we left the campground. She had called him by his name. They had exchanged high-fives with each other and smiled broadly as they departed.
“Why do you want to work with the disabled?” I asked.
“Because they seem so happy. It’s like they don’t know that they are disabled,” she responded.
“They’re always smiling. I like them.”
Camp Christopher accommodates children and young adults from all over the region. The diminished mental capacities of a few of the campers doesn’t subtract from the camp's potential to transform lives — it only adds to it in ways many might not imagine.
My little singer, writer, future lawyer now has an appreciation for others with whom she had never had much exposure with before. Her capacity for compassion has been expanded. We have the Catholic-run camp to thank for that. It clearly lived up to its motto: “Come grow with us.”
Only perhaps next year they might also teach her how to sew. I know just the shirt I’ll be sending with her.

Phillip Morris is a Metro Columnist for The Plain Dealer. He also blogs, discussing general interest topics with a focus, on Cleveland.com at www.cleveland.com/morris/.

For many Finding the RIGHT Children’s Summer Camp is the most stressful challeng of the winter season. Choosing a camp should not be taken lightly. Summer camps are not a one size fits all. Careful consideration must be made to match your child’s needs wants and desires up with the proper Kids camp. If you have never done summer camp before or if you have I suggest going to Summer Camp Advisor, this website will help you understand what day camp and resident camp is call about. There is a lot of reading but it will help ensure your child has the best summer. 
In addition, there are camp directories, that help minimize the time You spend searching the Internet. These many camp directories have paid camp listings. These directories can help in the selection process. They organize summer camps by regions or particular specialization. After spending a little effort on each of these sites, you’ll have a good idea about which summer camp will be best for your camper. Please remember that this is only the beginning and its’ best to always call the camp director and make sure you feel comfortable with all areas of that summer camp.
Please be sure to check out 
Swift Nature Camp as an option for your child.



permalink=”http://www.swiftnaturecamp.com/blog”>
For many Finding the RIGHT Children’s Summer Camp is the most stressful challeng of the winter season. Choosing a camp should not be taken lightly. Summer camps are not a one size fits all. Careful consideration must be made to match your child’s needs wants and desires up with the proper Kids camp. If you have never done summer camp before or if you have I suggest going to Summer Camp Advisor, this website will help you understand what day camp and resident camp is call about. There is a lot of reading but it will help ensure your child has the best summer. 
In addition, there are camp directories, that help minimize the time You spend searching the Internet. These many camp directories have paid camp listings. These directories can help in the selection process. They organize summer camps by regions or particular specialization. After spending a little effort on each of these sites, you’ll have a good idea about which summer camp will be best for your camper. Please remember that this is only the beginning and its’ best to always call the camp director and make sure you feel comfortable with all areas of that summer camp.
Please be sure to check out 
Swift Nature Camp as an option for your child.


Summer Camp Should Be Mandatory for a Child: 
It Changes Lives

By Phillip Morris
Call it an emotional report card.
It was one of those moments that give you a reality check on how your kid really feels about you deep down.........
I had just rounded the bend that led to her cabin at Camp Christopher, a residential campground in Bath Township. It was Saturday, and she had been gone for six days — the longest she had been separated from her mother and me during her eleven years on the planet.
I was busy running my mouth, so the little girl spotted me first and set upon me like a blur. As she screamed “Daddy!” while racing the fifty yards or so toward me, I noticed that she had a large black boot on her left foot and a sandal on her right.
She nearly bowled me over as she leaped into my arms and exclaimed “Daddy!” several times and hugged me tight.
She told me she missed me “so much,” and then shifted her weight, which was my signal to put her down.
Once on the ground, she stepped back, looked me up and down, and then spoke to a friend who had come running up behind her: “My dad has a hole in his t-shirt. Daddy, why are you wearing that shirt?” she asked, redirecting her gaze toward me.
I could only shake my head. That’s when I knew my loving moment was over. Now Faith was back to being a pre-teen.
My designer t-shirt, with the strategically placed designer hole in it, was fair game. Now, after being separated for a week, I had to stand there and listen while my gear was publicly critiqued by a sixth-grader wearing a rubber boot and a sandal.
It wasn’t until we got the girl to the car with all of her luggage — including the broken sandal that had been replaced by the boot — that I started to understand how a week away from the parents, how a week at a well-run 
summer camp, can change your kid’s perspective, if not their life.
Only after she did a rapid checklist of everything she had done during the week — the swimming, the hiking, the canoeing, the fishing, the archery, the zip-lining, the horseback riding, and the learning of more campground songs, cheers, and prayers than any kid she should learn in six days — did she finally get to the heart of her camping experience.
“Daddy, I know what I want to do now when I grow up,” she said about thirty minutes into our drive home.
“I want to work with mentally disabled people.”
The short statement that seemingly came out of left field momentarily stunned me.
The girl has told folks for years that she plans to become a singer, a writer, and possibly an attorney when she grew up.
But as we drove, I recalled that she had enthusiastically spoken to a mentally-challenged young man as we left the campground. She had called him by his name. They had exchanged high-fives with each other and smiled broadly as they departed.
“Why do you want to work with the disabled?” I asked.
“Because they seem so happy. It’s like they don’t know that they are disabled,” she responded.
“They’re always smiling. I like them.”
Camp Christopher accommodates children and young adults from all over the region. The diminished mental capacities of a few of the campers doesn’t subtract from the camp's potential to transform lives — it only adds to it in ways many might not imagine.
My little singer, writer, future lawyer now has an appreciation for others with whom she had never had much exposure with before. Her capacity for compassion has been expanded. We have the Catholic-run camp to thank for that. It clearly lived up to its motto: “Come grow with us.”
Only perhaps next year they might also teach her how to sew. I know just the shirt I’ll be sending with her.

Phillip Morris is a Metro Columnist for The Plain Dealer. He also blogs, discussing general interest topics with a focus, on Cleveland.com at www.cleveland.com/morris/.

For many Finding the RIGHT Children’s Summer Camp is the most stressful challeng of the winter season. Choosing a camp should not be taken lightly. Summer camps are not a one size fits all. Careful consideration must be made to match your child’s needs wants and desires up with the proper Kids camp. If you have never done summer camp before or if you have I suggest going to Summer Camp Advisor, this website will help you understand what day camp and resident camp is call about. There is a lot of reading but it will help ensure your child has the best summer. 
In addition, there are camp directories, that help minimize the time You spend searching the Internet. These many camp directories have paid camp listings. These directories can help in the selection process. They organize summer camps by regions or particular specialization. After spending a little effort on each of these sites, you’ll have a good idea about which summer camp will be best for your camper. Please remember that this is only the beginning and its’ best to always call the camp director and make sure you feel comfortable with all areas of that summer camp.
Please be sure to check out 
Swift Nature Camp as an option for your child.



permalink=”http://www.swiftnaturecamp.com/blog”>
For many Finding the RIGHT Children’s Summer Camp is the most stressful challeng of the winter season. Choosing a camp should not be taken lightly. Summer camps are not a one size fits all. Careful consideration must be made to match your child’s needs wants and desires up with the proper Kids camp. If you have never done summer camp before or if you have I suggest going to Summer Camp Advisor, this website will help you understand what day camp and resident camp is call about. There is a lot of reading but it will help ensure your child has the best summer. 
In addition, there are camp directories, that help minimize the time You spend searching the Internet. These many camp directories have paid camp listings. These directories can help in the selection process. They organize summer camps by regions or particular specialization. After spending a little effort on each of these sites, you’ll have a good idea about which summer camp will be best for your camper. Please remember that this is only the beginning and its’ best to always call the camp director and make sure you feel comfortable with all areas of that summer camp.
Please be sure to check out 
Swift Nature Camp as an option for your child.


ep, Now is the time to see your camp friends! Please come join us at the Oak Brook Park District Pool for some 

fun and smiles. Don’t forget your suit.Here is the link to learn moreREUNION of 2012

Page 1 of 2

Winter

25 Baybrook Ln.

Oak Brook, IL 60523

Phone: 630-654-8036

swiftcamp@aol.com

Camp

W7471 Ernie Swift Rd.

Minong, WI 54859

Phone: 715-466-5666

swiftcamp@aol.com

Skype Stumble Upon Twitter Facebook Instagram