As parents we love our children and we want the best for them. Yet, what is our goal? As much as we love them its to get our kids out of the house. Yes, we need to launch them into the real world. In order to make this happen successfully we need to raise independent, self-sufficient human beings. Accomplishing this goal requires prent to always be thinking. What is the best route to take between helpless...
Independence is best built gradually. We want to build such skills as making sound decisions, caring for one's own needs, taking action to meet goals, being responsible for one's own actions, and seeking out the information we need to guide choices. None of these things will develop magically or over night, however. Kids need a range of experiences, from simple to complex, in order to learn these skills. Let's take a quick look at each of these areas.
Wise decisions begin with baby steps. We wouldn't dream of turning our young adults loose in a car with out training and supervised practice. So why would we not do the same in decision making. Small children need to be allowed to make decisions as soon as they are capable of choosing between two things. This can with guided choices "Do you want your striped pants or your green pants today?" or "It's your turn to choose what veggies do you want for supper." Now here is the important part. What do you say after the decision? Do you process the results from their decisions? Point out the advantages and disadvantages of each choice, and then allow your child to choose. Be sure you are intentional and only suggest acceptable choices sot here is no chance of making a wrong choice. As kids grow open the door to making choices.
Children need practice and experience to make good decisions. After all, humans tend to learn more when things don't go the way we expected. A common error for parents is not to give children practice in making mistakes. Often because it is quicker or easier. Yet, we need to give our children responsibilities. Spent time to teach your children how to do personal and household tasks. Kids will try very hard to learn these skills. Plus, when the child does finally become proficient, you will have eased your own burden in many ways and they feel satisfied in their accomplishments.
Children's Summer Camp is a wonderful place that challenges your child to become responsible for their stuff and actions. At camp children are supervised but not coddled so clothes left on the floor need to be picked up, their is no maid service. Parents often tell us that the true benefit of summer camp is the increased self confidence and initiative to get chores done around the house.
Findi aSummer Camp at SummerCampAdvice.com
Swift Nature Camp is a Overnight Summer Camp for boys and girls ages 6-15. We blend Traditional camp activities with that of a Science Camp.
infancy and independent adulthood?
Often Parents are curious if Swift Nature Camp has specific programs for certain aged children. Are SNC programs better for young children- a first time at camp, middle school- looking for new activities or teenagers- searching for teen adventure. Since we feel we do so well in all these areas let us give you a few reasons why.
 
  • First off we have a Discovery Program that is only for children who have never been to camp before. For this camp we shrink the amount of children at camp making sure that we can give individual attention to each child. We have about 6 children for 2 counselors in each cabin. This program, since it is everyones first time creates a level playing feild for everyone. And since we know it everyones first time at camp we are constantly on the look out for homesickness or other areas of concern.
  • For our 3 week programs, again our small size allows us to give individual attention to all, with around 90 children (45 gals, 45 boys). Our children are divided by gender and age group. So a cabin of 10 children will have lets say 9 & 10 year olds. We limit the age groups at camp so that we get an even distribution of campers , younger to older. Then each age group will participate in age appropriate activities and adventure trips. For instance the younger girls may take a canoe trip to a nearby island while the older girls may go to the Apostle Islands for 3 days.
  • So you can see how Swift Nature Camp meets every age and gender. If you would like to talk more please give us an email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
As parents we love our children and we want the best for them. Yet, what is our goal? As much as we love them its to get our kids out of the house. Yes, we need to launch them into the real world. In order to make this happen successfully we need to raise independent, self-sufficient human beings. Accomplishing this goal requires prent to always be thinking. What is the best route to take between helpless...
Independence is best built gradually. We want to build such skills as making sound decisions, caring for one's own needs, taking action to meet goals, being responsible for one's own actions, and seeking out the information we need to guide choices. None of these things will develop magically or over night, however. Kids need a range of experiences, from simple to complex, in order to learn these skills. Let's take a quick look at each of these areas.
Wise decisions begin with baby steps. We wouldn't dream of turning our young adults loose in a car with out training and supervised practice. So why would we not do the same in decision making. Small children need to be allowed to make decisions as soon as they are capable of choosing between two things. This can with guided choices "Do you want your striped pants or your green pants today?" or "It's your turn to choose what veggies do you want for supper." Now here is the important part. What do you say after the decision? Do you process the results from their decisions? Point out the advantages and disadvantages of each choice, and then allow your child to choose. Be sure you are intentional and only suggest acceptable choices sot here is no chance of making a wrong choice. As kids grow open the door to making choices.
Children need practice and experience to make good decisions. After all, humans tend to learn more when things don't go the way we expected. A common error for parents is not to give children practice in making mistakes. Often because it is quicker or easier. Yet, we need to give our children responsibilities. Spent time to teach your children how to do personal and household tasks. Kids will try very hard to learn these skills. Plus, when the child does finally become proficient, you will have eased your own burden in many ways and they feel satisfied in their accomplishments.
Children's Summer Camp is a wonderful place that challenges your child to become responsible for their stuff and actions. At camp children are supervised but not coddled so clothes left on the floor need to be picked up, their is no maid service. Parents often tell us that the true benefit of summer camp is the increased self confidence and initiative to get chores done around the house.
Findi aSummer Camp at SummerCampAdvice.com
Swift Nature Camp is a Overnight Summer Camp for boys and girls ages 6-15. We blend Traditional camp activities with that of a Science Camp.
infancy and independent adulthood?
As parents we love our children and we want the best for them. Yet, what is our goal? As much as we love them its to get our kids out of the house. Yes, we need to launch them into the real world. In order to make this happen successfully we need to raise independent, self-sufficient human beings. Accomplishing this goal requires prent to always be thinking. What is the best route to take between helpless...... 
permalink=”http://www.swiftnaturecamp.com/blog”>

Independence is best built gradually. We want to build such skills as making sound decisions, caring for one's own needs, taking action to meet goals, being responsible for one's own actions, and seeking out the information we need to guide choices. None of these things will develop magically or over night, however. Kids need a range of experiences, from simple to complex, in order to learn these skills. Let's take a quick look at each of these areas.
Wise decisions begin with baby steps. We wouldn't dream of turning our young adults loose in a car with out training and supervised practice. So why would we not do the same in decision making. Small children need to be allowed to make decisions as soon as they are capable of choosing between two things. This can with guided choices "Do you want your striped pants or your green pants today?" or "It's your turn to choose what veggies do you want for supper." Now here is the important part. What do you say after the decision? Do you process the results from their decisions? Point out the advantages and disadvantages of each choice, and then allow your child to choose. Be sure you are intentional and only suggest acceptable choices sot here is no chance of making a wrong choice. As kids grow open the door to making choices.
Children need practice and experience to make good decisions. After all, humans tend to learn more when things don't go the way we expected. A common error for parents is not to give children practice in making mistakes. Often because it is quicker or easier. Yet, we need to give our children responsibilities. Spent time to teach your children how to do personal and household tasks. Kids will try very hard to learn these skills. Plus, when the child does finally become proficient, you will have eased your own burden in many ways and they feel satisfied in their accomplishments.
Children's Summer Camp is a wonderful place that challenges your child to become responsible for their stuff and actions. At camp children are supervised but not coddled so clothes left on the floor need to be picked up, their is no maid service. Parents often tell us that the true benefit of summer camp is the increased self confidence and initiative to get chores done around the house.
Findi aSummer Camp at SummerCampAdvice.com
Swift Nature Camp is a Overnight Summer Camp for boys and girls ages 6-15. We blend Traditional camp activities with that of a Science Camp.
infancy and independent adulthood?
Is seems as if we are learning more that Summer Camp helps children grow into mature adults. A new British study finds that most modern parents overprotect their kids. Half of all kids have stopped climbing trees, and 17 percent have been told that they can't play tag or chase. Even hide-and-seek has been deemed dangerous. And that dreaded stick...will put out someone’s eye”.
It is easy to blame technology for the decline in outdoor play, but it may well be mom and dad. Adrian Voce of Play England says 'Children are not being allowed many of the freedoms that were taken for granted when we were children,' 'They are not enjoying the opportunities to play outside that most people would have thought of as normal when they were growing up.' 
According to the Guardian, "Voce argued that it was becoming a 'social norm' for younger children to be allowed out only when accompanied by an adult. 'Logistically that is very difficult for parents to manage because of the time pressures on normal family life,' he said. 'If you don't want your children to play out alone and you have not got the time to take them out then they will spend more time on the computer.'
The Play England study quotes a number of play providers who highlight the benefits to children of taking risks. 'Risk-taking increases the resilience of children,' said one. 'It helps them make judgments,' said another. We as 
parents want to play it safe and we need to rethink safety vs adventure. The research also lists examples of risky play that should be encouraged including fire-building, den-making, watersports, paintballing, boxing and climbing trees. Summer camp provides an excellent opportunity for children to get outside take risks and play, all while still while being supervised by concerned young adults...we call counselors. See how Swift Nature Camp can put Adventure back into your childs life.
permalink=”http://www.swiftnaturecamp.com/blog”>

Today, millions of children suffer from a lack of outdoor exposure and play, summer vacation only increases a parents' concerns about their kids spending days in front of the television, computer or electronic gaming.
Even with a challenging economy, many parents realize the benefits of investing in their kids' futures with the summer camp experiences . Summer Camp is a safe and nurturing place that promotes outdoor play but more importantly it builds important life skills.
Richard Louv, author of "Last Child in the Woods: Saving our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder" and chairman of the Children & Nature Network, believes "Free play in natural areas enhances children's cognitive flexibility, problem-solving ability, creativity, self-esteem and self-discipline." and that "Children are simply happier and healthier when they have frequent and varied opportunities for experiences in the out-of-doors,"
permalink=”http://www.swiftnaturecamp.com/blog”>
Today, millions of children suffer from a lack of outdoor exposure and play, summer vacation only increases a parents' concerns about their kids spending days in front of the television, computer or electronic gaming.
Even with a challenging economy, many parents realize the benefits of investing in their kids' futures with the summer camp experiences . Summer Camp is a safe and nurturing place that promotes outdoor play but more importantly it builds important life skills.
Richard Louv, author of "Last Child in the Woods: Saving our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder" and chairman of the Children & Nature Network, believes "Free play in natural areas enhances children's cognitive flexibility, problem-solving ability, creativity, self-esteem and self-discipline." and that "Children are simply happier and healthier when they have frequent and varied opportunities for experiences in the out-of-doors,"
Summer camp provides the right setting for building self-confidence, social comfort, peer relationships, environmental awareness and a deeper sense of values. It is clear that "Overnight" camps result in even higher levels of success in fostering relationships and building life skills. just ask Michael Eisner, past president of Disney in his book "Camp" believes in the summer camp experience.
Along with the benefits of supervised, outdoor recreation and play, there are other reasons to consider camp as an important part of youth development:
* Build self-esteem -- Studies show self-esteem comes from feeling competent and having successful experiences, and youth report significant increases after attending camp.
*Build leadership skills -- Camps play a critical role in fostering leadership skills by giving young people responsibilities unavailable in other settings, such as self-selecting activities, maintaining camp areas and mentoring younger campers.
* Learn life skills -- Camps provide fun and positive ways to define and cultivate life skills, whether learning patience through archery, building confidence by zip lining or working as a team playing water polo.
* Get kids outdoors -- Summer camp teaches youth to be "more green" by connecting campers with their outdoor surroundings and opening awareness for our planet. The Children & Nature Network, an organization that is dedicated to help children experience nature's joys and lessons, supports summer camps as a way to connect children with nature.
* Push comfort zones -- Trying new challenges is the key to building self-confidence, and ACA research shows 75 percent of campers push themselves to learn new things at camp. ACA accredited camps like Camp Lincoln/Camp Lake Hubert, must comply with up to 300 health and safety standards.
* Have fun -- Counselors help campers discover how fun the great outdoors can be designing safe, engaging activities that let kids be kids, while teaching valuable life lessons.
* Develop quality relationships -- Camps create community cultures that minimize social pressures, making campers feel more themselves. Camp fosters an environment for supportive adult relationships, like those between counselors and campers, which research proves is a source of emotional guidance.
* Gain independence -- While the idea of sending kids away to camp may give parents uneasy feelings, the American Camp Association reports the experience of achievement and social connection away from home can nurture a child's independence.
More information on ACA accredited camps and related studies are available at www.acacamps.org. To learn more about selecting a camp see Summer Camp Advice
Today, millions of children suffer from a lack of outdoor exposure and play, summer vacation only increases a parents' concerns about their kids spending days in front of the television, computer or electronic gaming.
Even with a challenging economy, many parents realize the benefits of investing in their kids' futures with the summer camp experiences . Summer Camp is a safe and nurturing place that promotes outdoor play but more importantly it builds important life skills.
Richard Louv, author of "Last Child in the Woods: Saving our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder" and chairman of the Children & Nature Network, believes "Free play in natural areas enhances children's cognitive flexibility, problem-solving ability, creativity, self-esteem and self-discipline." and that "Children are simply happier and healthier when they have frequent and varied opportunities for experiences in the out-of-doors,"
permalink=”http://www.swiftnaturecamp.com/blog”>
Today, millions of children suffer from a lack of outdoor exposure and play, summer vacation only increases a parents' concerns about their kids spending days in front of the television, computer or electronic gaming.
Even with a challenging economy, many parents realize the benefits of investing in their kids' futures with the summer camp experiences . Summer Camp is a safe and nurturing place that promotes outdoor play but more importantly it builds important life skills.
Richard Louv, author of "Last Child in the Woods: Saving our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder" and chairman of the Children & Nature Network, believes "Free play in natural areas enhances children's cognitive flexibility, problem-solving ability, creativity, self-esteem and self-discipline." and that "Children are simply happier and healthier when they have frequent and varied opportunities for experiences in the out-of-doors,"
Summer camp provides the right setting for building self-confidence, social comfort, peer relationships, environmental awareness and a deeper sense of values. It is clear that "Overnight" camps result in even higher levels of success in fostering relationships and building life skills. just ask Michael Eisner, past president of Disney in his book "Camp" believes in the summer camp experience.
Along with the benefits of supervised, outdoor recreation and play, there are other reasons to consider camp as an important part of youth development:
* Build self-esteem -- Studies show self-esteem comes from feeling competent and having successful experiences, and youth report significant increases after attending camp.
*Build leadership skills -- Camps play a critical role in fostering leadership skills by giving young people responsibilities unavailable in other settings, such as self-selecting activities, maintaining camp areas and mentoring younger campers.
* Learn life skills -- Camps provide fun and positive ways to define and cultivate life skills, whether learning patience through archery, building confidence by zip lining or working as a team playing water polo.
* Get kids outdoors -- Summer camp teaches youth to be "more green" by connecting campers with their outdoor surroundings and opening awareness for our planet. The Children & Nature Network, an organization that is dedicated to help children experience nature's joys and lessons, supports summer camps as a way to connect children with nature.
* Push comfort zones -- Trying new challenges is the key to building self-confidence, and ACA research shows 75 percent of campers push themselves to learn new things at camp. ACA accredited camps like Camp Lincoln/Camp Lake Hubert, must comply with up to 300 health and safety standards.
* Have fun -- Counselors help campers discover how fun the great outdoors can be designing safe, engaging activities that let kids be kids, while teaching valuable life lessons.
* Develop quality relationships -- Camps create community cultures that minimize social pressures, making campers feel more themselves. Camp fosters an environment for supportive adult relationships, like those between counselors and campers, which research proves is a source of emotional guidance.
* Gain independence -- While the idea of sending kids away to camp may give parents uneasy feelings, the American Camp Association reports the experience of achievement and social connection away from home can nurture a child's independence.
More information on ACA accredited camps and related studies are available at www.acacamps.org. To learn more about selecting a camp see Summer Camp Advice
At long last, the Governor has signed into law the bill designating the Totogatic as Wisconsin’s fifth Wild 
River. The Totogatic joins the Pine, Pike, and Popple in northeastern Wisconsin and the Brunsweiler in 
Ashland County as the best of our best, to be protected and kept wild...

permalink=”http://www.swiftnaturecamp.com/blog”>



for future generations. 

In 1965, the Wisconsin “Wild Rivers” designation was established by the legislature to afford the people of the state an 
opportunity to enjoy natural streams.” Section 30.26 of the statutes further states that “it is in the interest of the state to 
preserve some rivers in a free-flowing condition and to protect them from development.”

Washburn County and Washburn County Lakes and Rivers Association, local citizens, the River Alliance of 
Wisconsin, UW-Extension and Wisconsin DNR have been seeking this designation since 2004. These groups 
worked very hard researching how to designate a river, and what the designation would mean for local river 
protection. There were several public meetings in 2005 and 2006, along with letters to legislators to ask for
their sponsorship. Finally early this year, Senator Bob Jauch and Representative Nick Milroy introduced 
legislation in the State Senate and Assembly (respectively). The bills passed committee hearings and floor 
debates, and Wisconsin Act 32 officially designating the river was signed into law by Governor Doyle on July 
10, 2009. 

The bill signing ceremony was held at Totogatic Park northwest of Minong on the Minong Flowage (an 
impounded reach of the river). The Slow no-wake legislation was also signed there that day, with young 
children having a swimming lesson in the flowage as a backdrop. Tony Tubbs was our eloquent Master of 
Ceremonies, with speeches by Washburn County Board Chair Michael Bobin, Washburn County Lakes and 
Rivers Association President Cathie Erickson, and Wisconsin DNR’s St. Croix Basin Supervisor Kathy 
Bartilson. Earl Cook, President of the Wisconsin Association of Lakes, spoke on the Slow-no wake bill, as did 
Jim Brakken, Bayfield County Lakes Forum President. Dale Cox, a National Park Service Ranger with the St. 
Croix National Scenic Riverway encouraged our river protection efforts, and shared his poem “I Will Meet you 
at the River.” Governor Doyle, Senator Jauch, Representative Milroy and DNR Secretary Matt Frank were
present for the official signing of both bills in the park pavilion, under a “Totogatic – Wild by Law” banner. 

The Totogatic is a wild gem flowing through Bayfield, Sawyer, Washburn, Douglas and Burnett Counties. It 
provides rich habitat for diverse aquatic and terrestrial species, has excellent water quality, beautiful scenery, 
and great fishing and paddling opportunities. The free-flowing reaches are now designated wild, with the four 
flowages (Nelson Lake, Totogatic Flowage, Colton Flowage, and Minong Flowage) excluded. Here is a 
description of the designated reaches: 

oFirst Reach: From the outlet of Totogatic Lake (located in Bayfield County) to the upstream end of 
Nelson Lake (located in Sawyer County). 
oSecond Reach: From a point 500 feet below the dam in the Totogatic Wildlife Area to the upstream end 
of the Colton Flowage (both located in Washburn County). 
oThird Reach: From a point 500 feet below the dam that forms the Colton Flowage to the point where 
the river crosses the Washburn-Douglas County line immediately above the upstream end of the Minong 
Flowage. 
oFourth Reach: From the bridge on CTH “I” in Washburn County to the confluence of the river with the 
Namekagon River in Burnett County. 

From the beginning, the goal of this effort has been for all landowners and visitors to work together to keep the 
river wild. The land ownership includes county forest frontage (some in all 5 counties), commercial forest, 
private recreational parcels, and a very small amount of state and federally-owned frontage. Wisconsin 
Administrative Code NR 302 specifies how land and water activities will be managed on Wild Rivers. This law 
specifies that the landowners along the river need to recognize and protect the wild characteristics. The rule 
limits grading on the banks to less than 10,000 square feet (the point at which a permit would be needed from 
the DNR), and prohibits docks, dams, bridges (other than on public roadways), dredging, filling, and removal of 
natural obstructions. 

A special case was written into the Totogatic Wild River bill to allow docks that were placed before the 
designation to remain, provided they are sized to meet current pier standards. These docks can be repaired and 
replaced, but not enlarged. New docks will not be allowed, in order to preserve the wild appearance of the river 
banks. Anyone who had a dock prior to the bill being signed is encouraged to contact Kathy Bartilson at 635-
4053. 

This is a great accomplishment on the part of local landowners, the counties, Washburn County Lakes and 
Rivers, and all of the citizens and agencies involved. It is one of the highest levels of stream protection possible 
under Wisconsin Statutes. With everyone working together, we can keep it not only “Wild by Law” but also 
“Wild by Example” with good stewardship, care and respect from all who live along it and visit it in years to 
come. 

Often Parents are curious if Swift Nature Camp has specific programs for certain aged children. Are SNC programs better for young children- a first time at camp, middle school- looking for new activities or teenagers- searching for teen adventure. Since we feel we do so well in all these areas let us give you a few reasons why.
permalink=”http://www.swiftnaturecamp.com/blog”>
 Often Parents are curious if Swift Nature Camp has specific programs for certain aged children. Are SNC programs better for young children- a first time at camp, middle school- looking for new activities or teenagers- searching for teen adventure. Since we feel we do so well in all these areas let us give you a few reasons why.
  • First off we have a Discovery Program that is only for children who have never been to camp before. For this camp we shrink the amount of children at camp making sure that we can give individual attention to each child. We have about 6 children for 2 counselors in each cabin. This program, since it is everyones first time creates a level playing feild for everyone. And since we know it everyones first time at camp we are constantly on the look out for homesickness or other areas of concern.
  • For our 3 week programs, again our small size allows us to give individual attention to all, with around 90 children (45 gals, 45 boys). Our children are divided by gender and age group. So a cabin of 10 children will have lets say 9 & 10 year olds. We limit the age groups at camp so that we get an even distribution of campers , younger to older. Then each age group will participate in age appropriate activities and adventure trips. For instance the younger girls may take a canoe trip to a nearby island while the older girls may go to the Apostle Islands for 3 days.
  • So you can see how Swift Nature Camp meets every age and gender. If you would like to talk more please give us an email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Often Parents are curious if Swift Nature Camp has specific programs for certain aged children. Are SNC programs better for young children- a first time at camp, middle school- looking for new activities or teenagers- searching for teen adventure. Since we feel we do so well in all these areas let us give you a few reasons why.
permalink=”http://www.swiftnaturecamp.com/blog”>
 Often Parents are curious if Swift Nature Camp has specific programs for certain aged children. Are SNC programs better for young children- a first time at camp, middle school- looking for new activities or teenagers- searching for teen adventure. Since we feel we do so well in all these areas let us give you a few reasons why.
  • First off we have a Discovery Program that is only for children who have never been to camp before. For this camp we shrink the amount of children at camp making sure that we can give individual attention to each child. We have about 6 children for 2 counselors in each cabin. This program, since it is everyones first time creates a level playing feild for everyone. And since we know it everyones first time at camp we are constantly on the look out for homesickness or other areas of concern.
  • For our 3 week programs, again our small size allows us to give individual attention to all, with around 90 children (45 gals, 45 boys). Our children are divided by gender and age group. So a cabin of 10 children will have lets say 9 & 10 year olds. We limit the age groups at camp so that we get an even distribution of campers , younger to older. Then each age group will participate in age appropriate activities and adventure trips. For instance the younger girls may take a canoe trip to a nearby island while the older girls may go to the Apostle Islands for 3 days.
  • So you can see how Swift Nature Camp meets every age and gender. If you would like to talk more please give us an email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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Winter

25 Baybrook Ln.

Oak Brook, IL 60523

Phone: 630-654-8036

swiftcamp@aol.com

Camp

W7471 Ernie Swift Rd.

Minong, WI 54859

Phone: 715-466-5666

swiftcamp@aol.com

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