The best way to save money on Summer camp is to start looking today.

Today you maybe thinking spring break but you should be thinking about summer and camp for your children. For many summer camp is that annual rite of passage where kids learn to row a boat, swim in a lake, and appreciate the sun setting over a lake. The American Camp Association (ACA) estimates the average cost of overnight summer camp at around $85 per day per, this includes the less expensive church camps at a few hundred a week to the private camps at over $1000 per week. 

Sounds pricy? You bet, but when you break it down to an hourly rate it cheaper than a movie. Here are just a few strategies that will help you best fit your child with camp at a price that is within your budget:


1. Begin as early as possible. It takes time to do the research and compare camps so start well before the summer is upon you. Once you have found camps with in your budget that you think your child will like, give them the choice. Here is the point often discounts are available for campers that sign up early. Planning ahead will gives you more time to save up for camp. At Swift Nature Camp we encourage families to start paying a few hundred every month as early as February so when the bill comes in June it is very manageable. 

2. Scholarships exist.Swift Nature Camplike other camps believes that every child should go to camp so we offer financial assistance programs. We look for donations plus we match our donations but these are on a first-come, first-served basis so funds do run out. Camps provide scholarships at a sliding scale don't think that your salary level will knock you out. 

3. Consult your accountant. Even if you don't qualify for scholarships or other discounts, you may be able to pay for day camp for kids under 13 using pre-tax dollars in a dependent care flexible spending arrangement (FSA). The IRS caps dependent care FSAs at $5,000 per year, and your employer withholds money from each paycheck to fund the plan.
Also consider the Child and Dependent Care Credit, which allows taxpayers to deduct up to 35 percent of their childcare expenses, up to a maximum of $6,000. "My best advice is to check with a tax planning professional and keep track of expenses," says Golden.


4. Other savings. If you enrolling multiple children to the same summer camp, you may qualify for a multi-child discount. A trend is to fill open bunks with a Groupon deal so keep looking for those. However, these are often at the end of the summer. If a traditional summer camp is outside your budget try looking more local at day programs or week long camps. Some of the best values for summer programs are local park districts, universities or community centers. Don’t rule out churches, local libraries, nonprofits like the YMCA, or scouting groups they often provide affordable summer programs.

5. Consider value, when selecting a summer camp. A favorite saying in among camp directors is “the memories of camp far outlast the price of camp”. It is so true 30 years from now your child will still have a sweat spot in their memory about camp and the price will long be forgotten. Prices should play an important role in your decision, but it should not the only factor when selecting where to send your child. 

The bottom line is camp is highly successful and regardless of cost (according the the ACA) 70% of parents said their child gained self-confidence at camp and nearly as many said their child remains in contact with friends made at camp. Therefore, a good summer camp program can create lasting memories and shape your child's development well into adulthood.

To learn more about 
selecting the right summer camp see SuumerCampAdvice.com

Pasted Graphic


Look it’s Ashley!
Mid October we happened to be driving by Madison Wi. and decided to stop on in and spend some time with Ashley. It was great fun! She showed us around the downtown area and we even had a bite to eat. (nothing like Michelle’s food :) So we got a talkin about one of Ashleys favorite topics- Arts & Crafts. She was wondering if we could do some more cool activities. “like what?” we wondered. She thought, maybe we could do more age appropriate activities so like older kids could do copper enameling and more clay, even some woodburing or something like that. We thought it was a great idea and so Ashley is busy working on how she can make Arts & Crafts better. 
If you have any ideas or activities that you feel we should do email Ashley at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The best way to save money on Summer camp is to start looking today.

Today you maybe thinking spring break but you should be thinking about summer and camp for your children. For many summer camp is that annual rite of passage where kids learn to row a boat, swim in a lake, and appreciate the sun setting over a lake. The American Camp Association (ACA) estimates the average cost of overnight summer camp at around $85 per day per, this includes the less expensive church camps at a few hundred a week to the private camps at over $1000 per week. 

Sounds pricy? You bet, but when you break it down to an hourly rate it cheaper than a movie. Here are just a few strategies that will help you best fit your child with camp at a price that is within your budget:
 

1. Begin as early as possible.

It takes time to do the research and compare camps so start well before the summer is upon you. Once you have found camps with in your budget that you think your child will like, give them the choice. Here is the point often discounts are available for campers that sign up early. Planning ahead will gives you more time to save up for camp. At Swift Nature Camp we encourage families to start paying a few hundred every month as early as February so when the bill comes in June it is very manageable. 
 

2. Scholarships exist.

 
Swift Nature Camplike other camps believes that every child should go to camp so we offer financial assistance programs. We look for donations plus we match our donations but these are on a first-come, first-served basis so funds do run out. Camps provide scholarships at a sliding scale don't think that your salary level will knock you out. 

3. Consult your accountant.

 
Even if you don't qualify for scholarships or other discounts, you may be able to pay for day camp for kids under 13 using pre-tax dollars in a dependent care flexible spending arrangement (FSA). The IRS caps dependent care FSAs at $5,000 per year, and your employer withholds money from each paycheck to fund the plan.
Also consider the Child and Dependent Care Credit, which allows taxpayers to deduct up to 35 percent of their childcare expenses, up to a maximum of $6,000. "My best advice is to check with a tax planning professional and keep track of expenses," says Golden.

4. Other savings.

 
If you enrolling multiple children to the same summer camp, you may qualify for a multi-child discount. A trend is to fill open bunks with a Groupon deal so keep looking for those. However, these are often at the end of the summer. If a traditional summer camp is outside your budget try looking more local at day programs or week long camps. Some of the best values for summer programs are local park districts, universities or community centers. Don’t rule out churches, local libraries, nonprofits like the YMCA, or scouting groups they often provide affordable summer programs.

5. Consider value, when selecting a summer camp.

 
A favorite saying in among camp directors is “the memories of camp far outlast the price of camp”. It is so true 30 years from now your child will still have a sweat spot in their memory about camp and the price will long be forgotten. Prices should play an important role in your decision, but it should not the only factor when selecting where to send your child. 

The bottom line is camp is highly successful and regardless of cost (according the the ACA) 70% of parents said their child gained self-confidence at camp and nearly as many said their child remains in contact with friends made at camp. Therefore, a good summer camp program can create lasting memories and shape your child's development well into adulthood.

To learn more about 
selecting the right summer camp see SuumerCampAdvice.com
The best way to save money on Summer camp is to start looking today.

Today you maybe thinking spring break but you should be thinking about summer and camp for your children. For many summer camp is that annual rite of passage where kids learn to row a boat, swim in a lake, and appreciate the sun setting over a lake. The American Camp Association (ACA) estimates the average cost of overnight summer camp at around $85 per day per, this includes the less expensive church camps at a few hundred a week to the private camps at over $1000 per week. 

Sounds pricy? You bet, but when you break it down to an hourly rate it cheaper than a movie. Here are just a few strategies that will help you best fit your child with camp at a price that is within your budget:

1. Begin as early as possible.

 
It takes time to do the research and compare camps so start well before the summer is upon you. Once you have found camps with in your budget that you think your child will like, give them the choice. Here is the point often discounts are available for campers that sign up early. Planning ahead will gives you more time to save up for camp. At Swift Nature Camp we encourage families to start paying a few hundred every month as early as February so when the bill comes in June it is very manageable. 

2. Scholarships exist.

 
Swift Nature Camplike other camps believes that every child should go to camp so we offer financial assistance programs. We look for donations plus we match our donations but these are on a first-come, first-served basis so funds do run out. Camps provide scholarships at a sliding scale don't think that your salary level will knock you out. 

3. Consult your accountant.

 
Even if you don't qualify for scholarships or other discounts, you may be able to pay for day camp for kids under 13 using pre-tax dollars in a dependent care flexible spending arrangement (FSA). The IRS caps dependent care FSAs at $5,000 per year, and your employer withholds money from each paycheck to fund the plan.
Also consider the Child and Dependent Care Credit, which allows taxpayers to deduct up to 35 percent of their childcare expenses, up to a maximum of $6,000. "My best advice is to check with a tax planning professional and keep track of expenses," says Golden.

4. Other savings.

 
If you enrolling multiple children to the same summer camp, you may qualify for a multi-child discount. A trend is to fill open bunks with a Groupon deal so keep looking for those. However, these are often at the end of the summer. If a traditional summer camp is outside your budget try looking more local at day programs or week long camps. Some of the best values for summer programs are local park districts, universities or community centers. Don’t rule out churches, local libraries, nonprofits like the YMCA, or scouting groups they often provide affordable summer programs.

5. Consider value, when selecting a summer camp.

 
A favorite saying in among camp directors is “the memories of camp far outlast the price of camp”. It is so true 30 years from now your child will still have a sweat spot in their memory about camp and the price will long be forgotten. Prices should play an important role in your decision, but it should not the only factor when selecting where to send your child. 

The bottom line is camp is highly successful and regardless of cost (according the the ACA) 70% of parents said their child gained self-confidence at camp and nearly as many said their child remains in contact with friends made at camp. Therefore, a good summer camp program can create lasting memories and shape your child's development well into adulthood.

To learn more about 
selecting the right summer camp see SuumerCampAdvice.com

Summer Camp Deductions with the Child Tax Credit


We all know the Joy of sending our child to camp. We save to make those days special for our children.
But are their any Tax advantages to sending your child to camp? Read on.



Summer Camps and Daycare Deductions with the Child Tax Credit

 
Updated for Tax Year: 2012
Reprinted from Turbo Tax
 


 

If you paid a daycare center, babysitter, summer camp, or other care provider to care for a qualifying child under age 13 or a disabled dependent of any age, you may qualify for a tax credit of up to $3,000 for one child or dependent, or up to $6,000 for two or more children or dependents.

The child and dependent care credit provides a tax break for many parents who are responsible for the cost of childcare. Though the credit is geared toward working parents or guardians, taxpayers who were full-time students or who were unemployed for part of the year may also qualify.
If you paid a daycare center, babysitter, summer camp, or other care provider to care for a qualifying child under age 13 or a disabled dependent of any age, you may qualify for a tax credit of up to $3,000 for one child or dependent, or up to $6,000 for two or more children or dependents.


Purpose of the child and dependent care credit


The child and dependent care credit is designed to assist working parents and guardians with some of the expenses involved in raising a child or caring for a disabled dependent. The credit, which varies depending on the taxpayer's earned income, is based on the expenses paid to provide child or dependent care services so that parents can work. It reduces the amount of federal income taxes due, which can in turn increase your refund. This frees up more money for some of the other expenses involved in raising a child.


Qualifications for the child and dependent care credit


You must meet several criteria to qualify for the child and dependent care credit. To qualify, you must meet all of the following:

 
You (and your spouse, if you are married filing jointly) must have earned income for the tax year.
  • You must be the custodial parent or main caretaker of the child or dependent.
  • The child or dependent care service must have been used so that you could work or look for employment.
  • Your filing status must be single, head of household, qualifying widow or widower with a dependent child, or married filing jointly.
  • Your child or dependent must be under 13 or must be disabled and physically or mentally incapable of caring for herself.
  • The childcare provider cannot be your spouse or dependent or the child's parent.

         
         
         
         
         
        • Qualifying expenses for the child and dependent care credit

        You may be aware that daycare fees qualify for the child and dependent care credit, but the IRS actually considers much more than just the cost of daycare for this credit. Qualifying expenses also include childcare provided by a babysitter or licensed dependent care center and the cost of a cook, housekeeper, maid, or cleaning person who provides care for the child or dependent. Day camp or summer camp fees, even for camps centered around a sport or activity, qualify if the camp was selected to provide care while the parent or parents were at work. Additional qualifying expenses include costs related to before- and after-school care for children under 13 and expenses related to a nurse, home care provider, or other care provider for a disabled dependent. Keep in mind that expenses related to schooling, tutoring, or overnight camps are not qualifying expenses.Special circumstancesSince every family is different, the IRS has a series of exceptions to the rules in the qualification process. These exceptions allow a greater number of families to take advantage of the credit.
          • For divorced or separated parents, the custodial parent (the parent with whom the child resides for the most nights out of the year) can claim the credit even if the other parent has the right to claim the child as a dependent due to the divorce or separation agreement.
          • You can take the credit for the care of a disabled adult even if you cannot claim her as a dependent because she has too much gross income or because you or your spouse can be claimed as a dependent by someone else.
          • If your spouse is a disabled adult, the IRS waives the requirement for him to have earned income.
          • If your spouse was a full-time student who attended college for at least five months out of the tax year, the IRS considers her to have earned income for each month that she was a full-time student.

        Today you maybe thinking spring break but you should be thinking about summer and camp for your children. For many summer camp is that annual rite of passage where kids learn to row a boat, swim in a lake, and appreciate the sun setting over a lake. The American Camp Association (ACA) estimates the average cost of overnight summer camp at around $85 per day per, this includes the less expensive church camps at a few hundred a week to the private camps at over $1000 per week. 

        Sounds pricy? You bet, but when you break it down to an hourly rate it cheaper than a movie. Here are just a few strategies that will help you best fit your child with camp at a price that is within your budget:


         

        1. Begin as early as possible.

         
         It takes time to do the research and compare camps so start well before the summer is upon you. Once you have found camps with in your budget that you think your child will like, give them the choice. Here is the point often discounts are available for campers that sign up early. Planning ahead will gives you more time to save up for camp. At Swift Nature Camp we encourage families to start paying a few hundred every month as early as February so when the bill comes in June it is very manageable. 

        2. Scholarships exist.

         
        Swift Nature Camplike other camps believes that every child should go to camp so we offer financial assistance programs. We look for donations plus we match our donations but these are on a first-come, first-served basis so funds do run out. Camps provide scholarships at a sliding scale don't think that your salary level will knock you out. 

        3. Consult your accountant.

         

         Even if you don't qualify for scholarships or other discounts, you may be able to pay for day camp for kids under 13 using pre-tax dollars in a dependent care flexible spending arrangement (FSA). The IRS caps dependent care FSAs at $5,000 per year, and your employer withholds money from each paycheck to fund the plan.
        Also consider the Child and Dependent Care Credit, which allows taxpayers to deduct up to 35 percent of their childcare expenses, up to a maximum of $6,000. "My best advice is to check with a tax planning professional and keep track of expenses," says Golden.

        4. Other savings.

         
        If you enrolling multiple children to the same summer camp, you may qualify for a multi-child discount. A trend is to fill open bunks with a Groupon deal so keep looking for those. However, these are often at the end of the summer. If a traditional summer camp is outside your budget try looking more local at day programs or week long camps. Some of the best values for summer programs are local park districts, universities or community centers. Don’t rule out churches, local libraries, nonprofits like the YMCA, or scouting groups they often provide affordable summer programs.
         

        5. Consider value, when selecting a summer camp.

         
         A favorite saying in among camp directors is “the memories of camp far outlast the price of camp”. It is so true 30 years from now your child will still have a sweat spot in their memory about camp and the price will long be forgotten. Prices should play an important role in your decision, but it should not the only factor when selecting where to send your child. 

        The bottom line is camp is highly successful and regardless of cost (according the the ACA) 70% of parents said their child gained self-confidence at camp and nearly as many said their child remains in contact with friends made at camp. Therefore, a good summer camp program can create lasting memories and shape your child's development well into adulthood.

        To learn more about 
        selecting the right summer camp see SuumerCampAdvice.com

         

        Camp Bean, All Things Woodsey from UCLA UniCamp on Vimeo.


        Saw this video and when I watched it seemed to be what SNC is all about.

         

        When one thinks of summer camp they think Archery. Yet, archery is so much more than just a way of spending time at camp. It provides us the opportunity to teach life skills: patients, following instructions and persistence just to name a few.

        Archery is one of the Swift Nature Camps most popular programs. Both beginner and advanced archers will receive high level instruction from experienced teachers. You'll learn a little about the history of archery as well as the safety rules and commands for the sport. You'll also learn how to string a recurve bows, notch and draw arrows, and proper stance, aiming, and firing.

        Our goal is for campers to have a positive first experience with archery. So they feel confident about their experience and want to do the sport more often. We often hear from parents that when their child got home they wanted to get a bow and arrow for the back yard. That makes us feel we are teaching archery the right way.



        So what can you do a camp that you cant do at Home? How bout shooting guns? Yep, one of the fun activity at this kids camp is riflery. This is one area at camp where there is no clowning around. We take teaching riflery very seriously. It may be a tradition at many summer camp. But we are very proud that our riflery range is our safest area at camp. At Swift Nature Camp we only shoot at targets and we shoot from the prone position (thats lying down) , our guns are single shot .22 caliber rifles. Our campers try to earn our camp Marksman awards. Often parents ask why have rifles at camp? The answer is ...we want to teach children how to properly and safely operate a gun. Campers also learn life lessons, like you need to practice and as you do practice bit by bit, you improve and before you know it you are loving Riflery.

        permalink=”http://www.swiftnaturecamp.com/blog”>

        So what can you do a camp that you cant do at Home? How bout shooting guns? Yep, one of the fun activity at this kids camp is riflery. This is one area at camp where there is no clowning around. We take teaching riflery very seriously. It may be a tradition at many summer camp. But we are very proud that our riflery range is our safest area at camp. At Swift Nature Camp we only shoot at targets and we shoot from the prone position (thats lying down) , our guns are single shot .22 caliber rifles. Our campers try to earn our camp Marksman awards. Often parents ask why have rifles at camp? The answer is ...we want to teach children how to properly and safely operate a gun. Campers also learn life lessons, like you need to practice and as you do practice bit by bit, you improve and before you know it you are loving Riflery.

         

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        Winter

        25 Baybrook Ln.

        Oak Brook, IL 60523

        Phone: 630-654-8036

        swiftcamp@aol.com

        Camp

        W7471 Ernie Swift Rd.

        Minong, WI 54859

        Phone: 715-466-5666

        swiftcamp@aol.com