National KIND Kid Contest

 


Complete Details

Students in grades K-6 are invited to apply for the Humane Society of the United States' KIND Kid Award. One winner will be selected to win $100 and two runners-up will each receive $50. 

Applicants should submit a detailed description of how they have helped animals, including photos. 

Enter by January 15, 2011. 

 
 

Resource Types: Contest/Award 

Audience Served: Families, General Public, Home Schools, Non-formal Educators, Private Schools, Public Schools, Scouts/Youth Groups, Teachers 

Age Groups: Kindergarten, 1st Grade, 2nd Grade, 3rd Grade, 4th Grade, 5th Grade, 6th Grade, Adults 

Environmental Focus: Animals/Wildlife, Biodiversity, Conservation, Ecology, Endangered Species, Environmental Health, Habitats/Ecosystems, Marine Education, Nature Awareness, Outdoor Skills/Recreation, Place-based Education, Sustainability 

Academic Focus: Character Education, Interdisciplinary, Science 

Often parents are a little surprised and concerned that their children learn to shoot a gun at summer camp.It is amazingly rewarding to hear a parent ask their child, “Are those real guns?” and the camper responds, “They sure are, we shoot .22 caliber guns’ as they beam with a huge smile. 

Obviously, safety is our first priority at riferly, and every camper knows it. Our range is completely controlled and supervised. The guns and ammunition are always locked and stored separately. The riflery sport instructors are trained and all of the campers are taught the proper safety protocols when they choose riflery for one of their activities. Any goofing around and they will not shoot again for the summer. What we are not trying to teach is shooting critters, or being dangerous or even self-defence.

What we are trying to teach children is that they can have responsibility if they are able to handle it. Can you think of anything requiring more responsibility than being able to shoot a gun. Yet something is magical in that child’s smile, as they tell their parent about their bullseye.


When one thinks of summer camp they think Archery. Yet, archery is so much more than just a way of spending time at camp. It provides us the opportunity to teach life skills: patients, following instructions and persistence just to name a few.

Archery is one of the Swift Nature Camps most popular programs. Both beginner and advanced archers will receive high level instruction from experienced teachers. You'll learn a little about the history of archery as well as the safety rules and commands for the sport. You'll also learn how to string a recurve bows, notch and draw arrows, and proper stance, aiming, and firing.

Our goal is for campers to have a positive first experience with archery. So they feel confident about their experience and want to do the sport more often. We often hear from parents that when their child got home they wanted to get a bow and arrow for the back yard. That makes us feel we are teaching archery the right way.



Swift Nature Camp, is a Summer Camp in Wisconsin where children play outside while learning about Nature and Science. Here are some helpful hints parents can do at home. Experts tell us the first step in becoming an environmentalist is noticing what nature offers. Such observation often leads to a desire and commitment to conserve and protect the natural world. Science Summer Camp

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Summer Camp in Wisconsin where children play outside while learning about Nature and Science. Here are some helpful hints parents can do at home

Experts tell us the first step in becoming an environmentalist is noticing what nature offers. Such observation often leads to a desire and commitment to conserve and protect the natural world.

However, with out having a purpose many times staff and campers merely walk along the trail without really noticing what is around them. They overlook the sounds, sights, textures and diversity of the ecosystem.

Please read these simple programs that can be done while walking through the woods. You may need suppliesbut it will take only a few minutes to get them. 

One you feel you have a feel for these activities invite your childrens friends to come along, I'm sure they too will enjoy being away from their scheduled lives and enjoy the peace of nature,

Look Down
Supplies: Yarn and scissors
Ahead of time: Cut the yarn into 15-inch pieces, have one for every two campers.
Assignment: Move off the trail, and make a square on the ground with the yarn. Study what you find within the square. What lives there? What is the soil like? What grows there? Use a stick and dig into the ground a little. What do you see?
Conversation: What did you find in the square or circle that surprised you?

Changes
Supplies: Clipboard and writing utensils
Ahead of time: think or research how things would be different if the land was developed
Assignment: Stop along the trail and look into the woods. Imagine that the land had sold this plot of land to a developer to build. How would that development changethings? What effect would it have on the habitat and food supplies of the animals living there? What would happen to the soil if the trees were cut down? How would the plants in the woods change? How would the threat of erosion increase?
Conversation: How have ecosystems near your home been destroyed? What changes have happened to the land?

Look a Tree
Supplies: Blindfolds
|Ahead of time: look for a place on the trail where there is a variety of trees.
Assignment: Find a partner and decide who will be blindfolded first. The sighted partner will lead his/her partner to a tree. The blindfolded child will explore the tree by touch and smell. Then the sighted partner leads his/her partner away from the tree. Once the blindfold is removed, that camper tries to locate the tree. Switch places and repeat.
Conversation: What have you learned about trees that you didn't know before?

Swift Nature Camp hopes this information give you few a simple projects we do at our camp out in Nature. If you child is interested in these sorts of activities Please look at our website and see if we might be part of your summer plans,

If this is your first time thinking about Summer Camp look at Summer Camp Advice a free website that helps parents fing the right camp for thier child. 

About the authors: Jeff and Lonnie Lorenz are the directors of Swift Nature Camp, a non-competitive, traditional overnight Animal Summer Camp. Boys and Girls Ages 6-15 enjoy nature & animals along with traditional camping activities. As a Summer Kids CampSwift specializes in programs for the First Time Campers as well as Adventure Teen Camp programs 

Swift Nature Camp, is a
So as parents that have a respect for Nature often I think what I want to leave my son. Obviously it will be a world with a clean and sustainable environment. But more importantly there are areas that I want him to internalize for himseelf. First and foremost is a love of being outdoors, but that is not enough....


Wild has value.

 
Wherever you see it large and small we must see and respect the wild.. THe wild where man has not interfered and where nature takes its course. Accept it and keep it we do not need to change it. 


Nature and Civilization have to be appreciated.

 
Man and nature have the ability to create art, it’s all how you see it. So take your time to be impressed by the amazing buildings man has created but dont forget that nature has been building a world for millennium. Appreciate the differences and the similarities.


Our impact on nature can be minimized.

 
Our foot print can be large or small. It is a choice we make by how we live our life. When out in nature do we pick the flower or just smell it and allow it to do what it does best? Whith knowledge we can be smarter and even creat more respect for that amazing force of nature. But more importantly if we take time to stop and observe nature we can learn from and do what we do even better.
 

Be prepared.

 
We control nature in many places and ways. Yet, what we can not control we fear. Being prepared in nature and in life reduces our fears. and worrying about the unknown. but it’s never truly tamed. Nature’s citizens generally don’t care about us. Reduce your fears and be prepared for all possible outcomes.
 

Everything is has value.

 
Ok, spiders can be a bit creepy. Yet, they are amazing creatures. Rather than seeing a reason to kill or change a life form... just keep walking and let it do what it does. Respect even if you are the stronger spieces. Plus, be aware that all parts of nature are incredibly complex, with each plant, animal, bacteria, and fungus having its own unique niche. 


Human life requires a healthy ecosystem.

 
Each day we learn more about how we effect nature and the environment both in a positive and negative way. So please be aware and do your part to protect this planet we live on, after all it is our responsibility. 
The Wisconsin No Child Left Inside Coalition is working to develop an Environmental Literacy Plan for Wisconsin that will address the environmental education needs of Wisconsin's pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade schools and will pay special attention to creating more opportunities to get kids outside. The Plan will recommend a comprehensive strategy to ensure every child graduates with the environmental skills and knowledge needed to contribute to a sustainable future.
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national NCLI Act and its various provisions and requirements here:
The Wisconsin No Child Left Inside Coalition is working to develop an Environmental Literacy Plan for Wisconsin that will address the environmental education needs of Wisconsin's pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade schools and will pay special attention to creating more opportunities to get kids outside. The Plan will recommend a comprehensive strategy to ensure every child graduates with the environmental skills and knowledge needed to contribute to a sustainable future.

Wisconsin has a strong environmental education foundation already established, with active schools, supporting organizations, and abundant opportunities to get outside in rural and urban settings. The Environmental Literacy Plan will build upon these strengths, and suggest priorities for present and future attention. It will lay out the next steps towards fulfilling on our State's commitment to ensure all people in Wisconsin are environmentally literate.

Currently, the Wisconsin NCLI Coalition is made up of representatives from: the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Wisconsin Center for Environmental Education, Wisconsin Environmental Education Board, Wisconsin Environmental Education Foundation, Wisconsin Association for Environmental Education, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Wisconsin Environmental Science Teachers Network, Milwaukee Public Schools, the Green Charter School Network, and the Environmental Education and Training Partnership. State Superintendent Evers has formally asked the Coalition to develop the Environmental Literacy Plan for Wisconsin.

Wisconsin’s Environmental Literacy Plan will be compliant with the pending national No Child Left Inside (NCLI) legislation. The No Child Left Inside Act requires States develop, implement, and evaluate a State Environmental Literacy Plan in order to be eligible to receive funding associated with the Act. Currently, the bill suggests an appropriation of $100 million to support the State Environmental Literacy Plans. You can learn more about the

National KIND Kid Contest


Complete Details

Students in grades K-6 are invited to apply for the Humane Society of the United States' KIND Kid Award. One winner will be selected to win $100 and two runners-up will each receive $50. 

Applicants should submit a detailed description of how they have helped animals, including photos. 

Enter by January 15, 2011. 

Resource Types: Contest/Award 

Audience Served: Families, General Public, Home Schools, Non-formal Educators, Private Schools, Public Schools, Scouts/Youth Groups, Teachers 

Age Groups: Kindergarten, 1st Grade, 2nd Grade, 3rd Grade, 4th Grade, 5th Grade, 6th Grade, Adults 

Environmental Focus: Animals/Wildlife, Biodiversity, Conservation, Ecology, Endangered Species, Environmental Health, Habitats/Ecosystems, Marine Education, Nature Awareness, Outdoor Skills/Recreation, Place-based Education, Sustainability 

Academic Focus: Character Education, Interdisciplinary, Science 

Often parents are a little surprised and concerned that their children learn to shoot a gun at summer camp.It is amazingly rewarding to hear a parent ask their child, “Are those real guns?” and the camper responds, “They sure are, we shoot .22 caliber guns’ as they beam with a huge smile. 

Obviously, safety is our first priority at riferly, and every camper knows it. Our range is completely controlled and supervised. The guns and ammunition are always locked and stored separately. The riflery sport instructors are trained and all of the campers are taught the proper safety protocols when they choose riflery for one of their activities. Any goofing around and they will not shoot again for the summer. What we are not trying to teach is shooting critters, or being dangerous or even self-defence.

What we are trying to teach children is that they can have responsibility if they are able to handle it. Can you think of anything requiring more responsibility than being able to shoot a gun. Yet something is magical in that child’s smile, as they tell their parent about their bullseye.
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Hey Parents,
Grab your child's hand and head in to Nature! Any adult who has a personal relationship with nature was once a child, hungry for knowledge and FUN...
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Hey Parents,
Grab your child's hand and head in to Nature! Any adult who has a personal relationship with nature was once a child, hungry for knowledge and FUN new experiences outdoors. It is not only a parents desire but their responsibility to foster a love of the outdoors at a young age. This effort, and for some it will be, not only will you be get the two of you to do some physical exercise, but you will also be introducing them to an endless amount of new information about the world around them. Hikes are a wonderful activity at any time of year. Spring offers the first flowers of the season. They may be wild or carefully planted in someone’s back yard. Either way, children enjoy the hunt for new buds and examining the different types of blooms that the season brings. At spring we also see an influx of birds. Younger kids are content to merely watch a bird fly, yet older children can find enjoyment in noting the different characteristics and identifying the breed of the bird they've discovered or even smearing some peanut butter on a pine cone and hanging it from a tree.

In summer, animals of all varieties are most active and easier to spot. Even in the city you can find a few squirrels in the trees. Carry your flower and bird watching activities into summer as well. Don’t forget to keep you feeder full and water in your birdbath.

Most folks do not see Autumn as the season of harvest and reproduction for nature. With a bag in hand start to collect pine cones, acorns, seeds and other items that can be used for crafts or displayed as is. Be sure to have your child identify each and tell you how it might be used in nature. A bouquet of colorful fall leaves is incredibly easy to create and will give your child a constant reminder of the fun they had outdoors.

Winter may not be the most hospitable season for many, nature hikes can still be incredibly rewarding. Try seeding a spot by picking out a specific area and throwing out seeds, bread, apple chunks or bird feed. Upon your return, examine the snow for tracks then determine which animals have been enjoying your feast. If you continue to supply the same area all winter, you will most likely get the chance to see if your guesses were correct before the snow melts. Remember, most animals are nocturnal so go out after school at dusk.

Don't feel the need to be constantly hiking to enjoy the outdoors. You can entertain your child plant a few early blooming flowers and keep the bird feeders full. A budding naturalist will want to check every day and see what’s new. Make sure to give them a journal to record their finds. Younger children may be happier drawing their finds, while an older child will be happy with a disposable camera to commemorate the changes they notice.

Gardening is a wonderful way to get children outdoors. Keep their attention span in mind while planning the size and number of plants, otherwise it will be extra work on your hands. Vegetables like carrots, leaf lettuce and radishes are almost foolproof, But the most rewarding and fun is getting one or two pumpkin for jack o' lanterns.

For most families outdoor activities are most often done in the summer. Yet, for most parents making the time to get out in nature can be a challenge. Camping is a great way to expose kids to nature, but rather than giving yourself the hassle of planning a week-long trip there are some options. First, just set up a tent one morning in the backyard. Cook your meals outside, fly kites and play tag. When it's time for bed, crawl into your tent and tell stories by flashlight. Second, have the pros help you out. Look for a day or an overnight summer camp that specializes in Nature and the outdoors. For many parents this might seem like a whole new area that they might be reluctant to get involved with, but once you do your research you will find that Summer Camp is so much more than just a break from your kids...it’s child development!


To learn more about Summer Camp visit www.summercampadvice.com

 

Swift Nature Camp is a Wisconsin Summer Camp for boys and girls ages 6-15. Our focus is to blend traditional summer camp activities while increasing a child's appreciation for nature, science and the environment. They also have a special “first time at summer camp” program that is dedicated to providing kids a wonderful first time experience.
Chinese philosopher Lao-tzu once said, "A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step." Start your child on their own thousand mile journey through life today. 

The most important Hint is to remember when looking for things to do in nature is to get OUTSIDE. Almost any indoor activity can be done outside in nature.

TV turn-off week is September 20 through 26. "A recent study found that the more time kids spend watching TV and movies or playing video games, the more likely they are to be obese, smoke cigarettes and not graduate from high school."  (The National Institute of Health and Common Sense Media)
 
With that in mind, how can families capitalize on this next week?
  • •Don't overreact to this newfound information and ban the TV for the entire week.  You don't have to experience a total blackout to gain the benefit.
  • •Look ahead before the week begins and determine if there are any shows or family movies that could be enjoyed together. Put those on your calendar.
  • •In order to convince your kids (and maybe another adult) that this is going to be a great experience, make it FUN! 
    • •Instead of TV, play a board game together.
    • •Most kids enjoy cooking as a family. Let your children choose the treat you can bake together or maybe plan the entire meal.
    • •Play outside at home or at a park or playground near your home.
    • •Go on an adventure. An adventure doesn't have to be exotic or expensive. It can be as simple as a picnic, a bike hike, or a penny walk...that's where you flip a coin at every intersection and go right (heads) or left (tails).  You might discover things you've never seen...right in your own neighborhood.       
  • •The key point is to connect with eachother. (And while you're doing that, you will get know some of the nicest people -- your family!)
  •  
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Winter

25 Baybrook Ln.

Oak Brook, IL 60523

Phone: 630-654-8036

swiftcamp@aol.com

Camp

W7471 Ernie Swift Rd.

Minong, WI 54859

Phone: 715-466-5666

swiftcamp@aol.com